A look at Beijing’s cultural industry from its culture, sports and entertainment radiation

Emilee Geist

BEIJING, Sept. 28, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — A news report from China.org.cn:

The 2020 Beijing Cultural Industry Development Conference, organized by the Publicity Department of the CPC Beijing Municipal Committee, was held on Sept. 6, as part of a featured event at the 2020 China International Fair for Trade in Services (CIFTIS). Zhou Muzhi, president of Cloud River Urban Research Institute and professor of Tokyo Keizai University, delivered a keynote speech titled “A look at Beijing’s cultural industry development from its culture, sports and entertainment radiation,” giving his insights into the good practices and new challenges of the city’s cultural industry. This article is a further elaboration on the topic based on his speech.

1. 2019 ranking on culture, sports and entertainment radiation of Chinese cities

As part of the China Integrated City Index, the Cloud River Urban Research Institute has released the 2019 ranking on culture, sports and

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KELLY HAWES: The lost art of seeking common ground | Opinion

Emilee Geist

Speaking about the prospects for replacing Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the nation’s highest court, former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie offered a prediction.

“There will no longer be 96-0 Antonin Scalia confirmations or unanimous Sandra Day O’Connor confirmations,” he said on ABC’s “This Week.” “Those days of politics, unfortunately in my view, … are gone now.”

Let’s hope he’s wrong.

There is every likelihood the Republican-controlled U.S. Senate will confirm President Donald J. Trump’s selection to succeed Ginsburg. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has promised as much.

And the opposition, of course, is already plotting revenge. There’s talk that if Democrats win back the Senate and the White House, they should pack the court by adding more members.

That’s a bad idea.

Republicans will tell you this whole fight was started by the Democrats. They say Harry Reid, when he was majority leader, invoked the so-called “nuclear option” when

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“Design is All About People”: Joshua Sanabria Explores Storytelling, Media and Alternative Paths

Emilee Geist

“Design is All About People”: Joshua Sanabria Explores Storytelling, Media and Alternative Paths

Storytelling is at the heart of architecture and design. For Josh Sanabria, CEO of independent media company DesignClass, great stories foster curiosity and creativity. Moving between design and technology, Sanabria has launched numerous competitions and interactive classes to celebrate design and advocate its impact. In a new interview with ArchDaily, Sanabria explores storytelling, media and technology, as well as how designers can create meaningful impact through their work.

Courtesy of Subject StudioCourtesy of Joshua SanabriaCourtesy of Joshua SanabriaCourtesy of Joshua Sanabria+ 7

Courtesy of Joshua Sanabria
Courtesy of Joshua Sanabria

Why did you choose to study architecture?

Like a lot of people who read ArchDaily, architecture was my first love. I always admired how buildings could be so much more than walls, windows, and doors. They could be powerful and emotional while merging the two worlds of art and logic.

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The patachitra-style posters of Saptarshi Dey

Emilee Geist

A Kolkata-based animator’s series of iconic film posters reimagined as patachitras is breaking the Internet

The Bride is back. Dressed in her yellow pantsuit, sabre poised, she is ready to strike again. Only, this time, her hair is black instead of gold, she wears a maang tika, and her almond eyes have the typical Bengali allure: this is the Kill Bill poster done in the patachitra style by Saptarshi Dey. The Kill Bill image is part of a series of 10 posters of iconic movies like Star Wars, Titanic, Godfather, E.T., King Kong, among others, reimagined as patachitras by Dey — even the giant ape atop the Empire State building has the potol-chera (sliced pointed gourd, if you like) eye made famous by Jamini Roy’s paintings. Some of the posters have tiny alpona patterns in the background, also characteristic of Jamini Roy.

Dey’s posters have

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How a Smart Digital Strategy Is Keeping David Zwirner at the Top of His Art World Game Amid the Pandemic

Emilee Geist

Click here to read the full article.



David Zwirner wearing a suit and tie


© Jason Schmidt


As late winter gave way to spring, which melted into summer, gallerist David Zwirner, accustomed to jetting to international fairs, biennials and exhibition openings, waited out the pandemic at his getaway house in Montauk, on the far tip of Long Island. For Zwirner, who commands an art empire that brought in nearly $800 million last year, with spaces in London, Paris and Hong Kong as well as three in New York, the tiny hamlet of Montauk is usually his happy place. He comes here to disconnect from the 24/7 demands of the global art world and surf some of the biggest swells on the East Coast. “I’m one of those guys who likes to separate work from home,” he says.


But Zwirner hasn’t caught too many waves this summer. “Now I work eight, nine hours,” he says over

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Talk is cheap. What are arts organizations doing about diversity and inclusion?

Emilee Geist

When George Floyd lost his life under the knee of a Minneapolis police officer, it was all too much. The nation was thrown into turmoil, and everyone chose a side, even arts organizations. There were black squares on social media, and various pledges for this or that. But what they all come down to are four basic questions:

— What are they in fact doing?

— Is it nonsense virtue signalling?

— What should the be doing?

— Is any of it working?

These stories kicks off the first in an ongoing series that will look at Chicago arts through those four crucial parameters.

More ‘lip service,’ or is this a real moment of change for inclusion in Chicago arts and culture?

“The current push is absolutely new and different from previous years,” says Julie Rodrigues Widholm, recently departed as the director of the DePaul Art Museum and who was,

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Springfield Museum of Art offers calming exhibit amid chaotic times

Emilee Geist

Peter Tonguette
 |  For The Columbus Dispatch

Between the coronavirus pandemic and the contentious political season, many central Ohioans may find themselves feeling a bit tired, weary or whiplashed.

The visual arts can help. Whether experienced in-person or virtually, galleries and museums can function as spaces to reflect, relax and ruminate.

Such is the aim of a new exhibit available online and in person at the Springfield Museum of Art. “What Makes Me Feel Safe?” offers a bevy of inspired works plucked from the museum’s permanent collection.

The eclectic pieces in the exhibit — which was organized by two members of the museum’s education staff, Alyson Annette Eshelman and Amy Korpieski — have little in common except a certain quality of contemplation, including loving portraits of parents and children, peaceful landscapes and calming abstract pieces.

Along with some interactive elements, the museum has installed the works in its Art Lab

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Asian American Arts Alliance Announces THE POTLUCK PLAYS: A DIGITAL FEAST

Emilee Geist

The event will take place online on Wednesday, October 21 between 7:00-8:00 PM EDT.

Asian American Arts Alliance Announces THE POTLUCK PLAYS: A DIGITAL FEAST

The Asian American Arts Alliance has announced The Potluck Plays: A Digital Feast, a virtual benefit event for the Asian American Arts Alliance. The event will take place online on Wednesday, October 21 between 7:00-8:00 PM EDT.

For its first virtual benefit, A4 has commissioned 2020 Van Lier Fellow, Miranda Cornell, and the 2016 Van Lier fellow, Seonjae Kim, to create a one-time only, interactive series of interconnected plays centered around food and community. The Van Lier Fellowship program aims to advance the careers and creative practice of Asian American artists living in New York City. This program supports early-career arts practitioners whose work shows outstanding promise in the fields of theater, music, and visual art to further develop their talent and to help establish them in the professional arts community.

During the benefit, A4 will

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Fulton County Arts And Culture Announces Poet Laureate

Emilee Geist

FULTON COUNTY, GA — Fulton County Arts and Culture recently selected Karen Head as the inaugural Poet Laureate of Fulton County. Head was confirmed by the Fulton County Board of Commissioners.

The Poet Laureate Program celebrates the rich culture of Fulton County and creates enthusiasm about the written and spoken word as well as promoting community activities and special programs.

“The enormous responsibility of originating this program and representing the nearly 1.1 million people in Fulton County is not lost on me. I am humbled and honored to have been selected,” Head said. “I’m excited about the good I know we can work together to affect. I am committed to all the people in our County, and I am passionate about the role of the arts, not only to help prepare people to have more successful and meaningful lives, but also to improve the communities in which we live.”

The

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