Art reviews: Edinburgh City Art Centre at 40 | Bright Shadows: Scottish Art in the 1920s | The Glasgow Boys and Girls

Emilee Geist

Edinburgh’s City Art Centre celebrates its 40th birthday in style, with two new exhibitions showing off some of the treasures in its collection, while The Glasgow Boys and Girls visit the Granary Gallery in Berwick

Friday, 18th September 2020, 5:50 pm

Updated Friday, 18th September 2020, 5:58 pm
Detail from The Chalk Pit, by George Henry, 1922, from Bright Shadows at the City Art Centre
Detail from The Chalk Pit, by George Henry, 1922, from Bright Shadows at the City Art Centre

City Art Centre at 40: Highlights from the City’s Art Collection, City Art Centre, Edinburgh *****

Bright Shadows: Scottish Art in the 1920s, City Art Centre, Edinburgh *****

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The Glasgow Boys and Girls, The Granary Gallery, Berwick *****

Detail from Cecile Walton at Crianlarich, 1920, by Eric Robertson, from Bright Shadows at the City Art Centre

Edinburgh’s City Art Centre is 40. That it has survived four decades is

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Sakarsa: New art space offers ray of hope amid pandemic – Art & Culture

Emilee Geist

The newly opened Sakarsa Art Space, designed by renowned architect Budi Pradono, waited a year to display its first exhibition.

The art space, located in Bekasi, West Java, that opened its doors on Sept. 9, is managed by Andonowati, director of ArtSociates and successful manager of Lawangwangi art space in Bandung, and curated by Asmudjo Jono Irianto.

Andonowati said the gallery, owned by Sakti Wahyu Trenggono, was completed last year and that she had been asked to organize the first exhibition before the pandemic intervened.

When asked about the timing for opening the art space during this difficult period, Andonowati, who likes to think inventively and is always searching for new possibilities for artists and collectors, is of the opinion that one must adjust to the challenges of the time.

She thinks that expanding her collectors network along with Wahyu Trenggono’s will be energizing and help revitalize the art scene

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Deputy Director To Discuss The Landscape And Design Of Hamptons Museum

Emilee Geist

There’s no better place to discuss Long Island’s landscape design and natural history than the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill. Its creative style has been a topic of interest for some time, and Parrish Deputy Director Scott Howe will speak about the Museum’s unique look in correlation with its location and its influence on various artists during Brain Food: Deputy Director Scott Howe on Parrish Art Museum Landscape. Howe will stun attendees with authentic maps, paintings and photographs while discussing the topic on Thursday, April 9th.

The Museum as well as the surrounding landscaping, reflect the natural environment, as well as the mission, of the East End. The design of the fourteen-acre site is indicative of the area’s culture, arts and history, according to Howe.

“Unlike New York, where natural history is an oxymoron, the East End reveals its natural history more readily,” Howe said. “Understanding that history

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art helps children to make sense of lockdown

Emilee Geist

A is for Annoyed, B is for Bored and C is for Confused: an alphabet of lockdown feelings created by Rivers, a 14-year-old from Gateshead, is just one of a dazzling range of 200 responses from young people to the Covid-19 crisis to be launched online on 16 October on a leading international art site.

The lockdown alphabet is to appear alongside 15-year-old Louis’ painting of a spotty teenage face, bathed in ghoulish green light, and a short film made by Maisie, a 15-year-old from Northumberland, as she nervously awaits yet another Zoom call.

Together the poems, films, dances, animations and paintings, all made by children and young adults with learning disabilities, are a powerful reminder that the voices of some of those most affected by lockdown have been largely drowned out by adult noise.

The Way I See It is an Arts Council England project and the result of

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Something else to celebrate besides Halloween–National Arts Month!

Emilee Geist

COLORADO SPRINGS — It’s time to put those brush strokes on display! During the month of October, arts and culture takes center stage across the Pikes Peak Region, as our community celebrates National Arts and Humanities month.

Every year the Cultural Office showcases local talent, providing opportunities for art advocacy. This year’s theme is the Art of Social Justice, and organizers are encouraging everyone to celebrate diversity in art.

To help kickoff Arts Month 2020, and acknowledge the importance around topics of racial equity and social justice. The Cultural Office collaborate with the Colorado Springs Black Business Network to present a virtual community conversation.

“Even though we have lectures, we have town halls, but how has music affected your understanding of how different people are living?” asked Rodney Gullatte Jr., President of the Rotary Club of Colorado Springs.

One local artist and poet says she hopes people will use this

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Coming up: Teaching kids Indigenous language and culture

Emilee Geist

School is where we go to learn writing, math and social studies. But for some students in our state, it’s also a place to learn about their culture.

Some Minnesota school districts are home to Native American education programs, where Native kids can learn Indigenous languages, art forms and history. At 11 a.m. Monday, MPR News host Angela Davis will talk with two educators who lead these programs about why they’re so important to have in our public schools.

She’ll also talk with an activist with Rock the Vote Native Style about voter registration and turnout, and what motivates Native voters.

Guests:

  • Gerald White is the Anishinaabe education coordinator and an Ojibwe instructor for Deer River Schools in Itasca County.

  • John Bobolink is the director of American Indian education for Saint Paul Public Schools.

  • Christian Taylor-Johnson is an organizer with Rock the Vote Native Style.

You make MPR News possible.

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Sheikha Bodour on preserving culture and the arts

Emilee Geist



Bodour bint Sultan bin Muhammad Al Qasimi posing for the camera: Exclusive: Sheikha Bodour on preserving culture and the arts


© Provided by Khaleej Times
Exclusive: Sheikha Bodour on preserving culture and the arts

When an explosion shattered Beirut in August, Sheikha Bodour Al Qasimi stepped in to restore some of the key libraries in the city – a gesture of love, she says, from one cultural capital to another. Ten years ago, Sheikha Bodour founded Kalimat, that has evolved from being a local children’s book publishing house to having five imprints under it. She is also the vice-president of International Publishers Association (IPA). Widely regarded as a cultural ambassador of the Arab world, Sheikha Bodour Al Qasimi talks about the challenges of preserving cultural capital in the wake of Covid-19.

Could you talk about your call for restoration of libraries and cultural centres in Lebanon?

Rebuilding the spirit of a city devastated by a terrible event, such as the one in Beirut

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MVP and the Real Winners and Losers of Bellator 248 and Bellator Paris | Bleacher Report

Emilee Geist

Photo courtesy of Bellator

Early on in the history of mixed martial arts, almost every country and jurisdiction fought fiercely to keep the new sport at a distance. But, over time, they fell like dominoes. In 2020, the sport once called “human cockfighting” is legal all over the world—even in the spiritual home of Western culture.

On Saturday afternoon, Paris, home of the Mona Lisa, the Louvre and the statues of Rodin, hosted its first legal major MMA event. Bellator promoter Scott Coker, who once broke ground with the first regulated MMA event in California with his Strikeforce promotion back in 2006, gave Parisians quite a show, displaying in one night all the techniques and the visceral violence that has made this the fastest growing sport in the world.

From the hyper-stylized striking of Michael “Venom” Page (18-1) to the grueling grind-you-down brutality of Cheick Kongo, new French fans at

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Keeping the spirits alive and happy in a difficult year in Houston

Emilee Geist



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

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Vote ‘Yes’ on arts trust fund question

Emilee Geist

Jersey City voters have the opportunity to make history this election by approving a non-binding referendum on adding a small levy to property tax bills for a dedicated Arts and Culture Trust Fund.

Similar to dedicated parks funds in Jersey City and other municipalities, the new fund would be the first in the state dedicated to underwriting local arts.

The idea was set in motion long before the pandemic. But the devastation the coronavirus has wreaked on arts programming and livelihoods has served to highlight the need to support and expand the arts.

Far too often, funding for the arts – whether in school or municipal budgets – is seen as expendable when pitted against other line items. Having a dedicated trust fund will counteract such short-sighted thinking.

The arts play so many vital roles in society: helping children learn to express themselves creatively; giving us beauty and thought-provoking

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