Philly Fringe Festival 2020 goes virtual due to COVID-19

Emilee Geist

Philadelphia’s 2020 iteration of the Fringe Festival kicks off Thursday, bringing to mind the adage, “The show must go on,” as artists, producers and directors find a way to perform for their audiences despite the pandemic. The novel coronavirus has forced the festival to go predominantly virtual this year. Producing […]

Philadelphia’s 2020 iteration of the Fringe Festival kicks off Thursday, bringing to mind the adage, “The show must go on,” as artists, producers and directors find a way to perform for their audiences despite the pandemic.

The novel coronavirus has forced the festival to go predominantly virtual this year. Producing Director Nick Stuccio says the multi-week theatrical showcase of more than 100 shows won’t be filling seats in theaters. Instead, it will more likely be broadcast in living rooms across the globe.

Take choreographer and director David Gordon’s piece “The Philadelphia Matter.” Speaking with Morning Edition Host Jennifer Lynn, Stuccio called it an example of a brave pivot from real-time to digital.

___

There is a heck of a lot of things that are on-demand and very well crafted for that reason. And I think of “The Philadelphia Matter” by David Gordon, who’s the seminal artist in our country, who was going to make this live space show with a lot of interesting dancers. And instead, he gave them all assignments. They went back to their homes and they went off into the woods and crazy places and built these dances. And he is editing all these together and is going to make this really, really, really cool dance film that would never have existed except for these conditions we’re working in now.

I also read about a performance called “Sign of the Times,” and we’re invited to send a message, so there’s some interaction there. There’s another one that I read about, where you’re supposed to grab your earbuds and you can be lulled to sleep, so a different way of interacting and a theatrical piece.

I love this one. And the promise is when you wake up, you’re going to know a whole magic world you didn’t know until you went to sleep.

I like that idea. And it’s different this year in that your audience can be anywhere. You are probably marketing internationally because you can. People don’t have to be at a theater at a certain time.

That’s right. The Fringe Festival’s a big festival, and we’ve had to pivot from being this in-person festival to being now one of the biggest digital arts festivals anywhere. And that’s getting a lot of attention. And so a lot of people will tune in to see what a big digital arts festival is like. We expect to get people from all over the world to see our shows.

The Fringe Festival has had virtual performances before, so I suppose it was in a unique situation to expand on that.

Exactly. We’ve had digital Fringe shows for four or five years now, and there are artists that specifically make shows for the digital space, and it’s been really cool. The last couple years, we’ve, as a staff every morning, sent around our pick for the coolest digital Fringe show. We watched it together. Now, almost all the show [is] in the digital space, and some of the artists who don’t make work in the digital space are learning from, are inspired by those artists in our region that make really cool work in the digital world. It should be a very rich experience for everybody.

Source Article

Next Post

University of Houston School of Art Spotlights Bold Voices in Contemporary Art, Design, and Criticism

From left to right, University of Houston School of Art Fall 2020 visiting speakers Aruna D’Souza, De Nichols, Nicholas Galanin, and Derrick Adams (photos by Dana Hoey, Cami Thomas, Will Wilson, and Christopher Garcia Valle) The University of Houston School of Art is proud to announce its Fall 2020 Visiting […]