Favell Museum art show profiles Oregon master painters | Local News

Emilee Geist

This year’s annual art show, hosted by the Favell Museum Sept. 26 – Nov. 7, features original, contemporary, representational art by 32 artists from throughout the West, according to a news release. The show includes oil, pastel, watercolor, acrylic, mixed media, glass, and bronze and wood sculpture encompassing landscape, cityscape, […]

This year’s annual art show, hosted by the Favell Museum Sept. 26 – Nov. 7, features original, contemporary, representational art by 32 artists from throughout the West, according to a news release.

The show includes oil, pastel, watercolor, acrylic, mixed media, glass, and bronze and wood sculpture encompassing landscape, cityscape, plein-air, figure, still-life, wildlife, historical art and more in a variety of styles.

Among this year’s featured artists are David Mensing, last year’s Peoples Choice recipient; Shelli Walters, a yearly favorite; and new to the show, Katherine Taylor.

Mensing grew up in Iowa, surrounded by wide prairies and groomed cornfields. When he moved to the West he was captivated by its raw beauty. His ambition is to share that beauty through his work. David’s architectural background contributes to his designs. His award-winning paintings are featured in exhibitions and collections around the world. Numerous periodicals have featured his work including American Art Collector, Southwest Art Magazine and Western Art Collector. Mensing lives in Sisters, OR with his wife and children.

Shelli Walters has lived in Oregon since she was a small child. Too young to tag along with her older sisters, she immersed herself in art. She attended design school and has been a graphic designer in Bend for 26 years. Walters always kept exploring fine art. Today she splits her time between mixed media art and graphic design. She is inspired by Oregon’s vast and diverse landscape and magical wildlife.

Katherine Taylor is an oil painter and longtime resident of Bend. Her signature style employs the dramatic lighting and luminosity of the Old Master’s classical approach she was trained in. Taylor studied art and architecture in Italy, where she was influenced by the Baroque preference for chiaroscuro (strong contrast of lights and darks). Her style today reflects new explorations of painterly marks with tools beyond the brush, to let the paint itself remain as beautiful as the subject. Her work has been included in juried exhibitions and private collections throughout the United States.

Forty percent of sales benefits the non-profit Favell Museum. The 2020 art show is also presented virtually at www.favellmuseum.org; online purchasing is available.

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