Five things to know about the B.C. Culture Days 2020 Celebration

Emilee Geist

Article content continued 2: It’s current. The mention of Culture Days often results in eye-rolling and expectations of the local community centre children’s folk-dancing group being up on stage. But there is a lot more going on than that. A great example is the ARTIVISM: SEX + The Unheard two-month-long […]

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2: It’s current. The mention of Culture Days often results in eye-rolling and expectations of the local community centre children’s folk-dancing group being up on stage. But there is a lot more going on than that. A great example is the ARTIVISM: SEX + The Unheard two-month-long digital festival running at the University of B.C. highlighting minority voices and their experiences with sex, gender, sexuality and ownership of the body. Film Studies student Coral Santana is behind the festival.

“It’s my first time being involved in Culture Days, and my first time curating a festival so it’s been a pretty exciting process,” said Santana. “Previously, I had helped organize smaller events or directed the Dive into UBC organization, which produces events on campus from student art pop-up shops to standup comedy nights. But nothing this scale and definitely not digital.”

3: It’s not all mainstream. Family friendly fare from the Cloverdale Heritage Driving Tour to various authors reading is still a big part of Culture Days. But Santana notes that some of the art at ARTIVISM would have once been considered taboo and might still be able to raise more than a few eyebrows.

And chances are most of us don’t make our own butter either. But you can learn how to at the self-guided session at the Historic Stewart Farm in Surrey. In other words, check your assumptions at the website and start exploring the variety of events.

4: Mentors, multimedia and more, oh my.Vancouver-based printmaker Edward Fu-Chen Juan is a foraging artist who makes his own water-based inks from natural ingredients. A 2020 B.C. Culture Days ambassador, Fu-Chen Juan had a mentorship with multimedia artist Brigitte Potter-Mael, who also has a plant-based practice. The two will discuss working with living things, each other’s art practice and figuring ideas out in Process (Part 1 of 5): Edward Fu-Chen Juan (Sept. 14).

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