Online & On Top: Edenic Design born from creator’s love of art

Emilee Geist

As part of Edenic Design’s collaborative efforts, some tables are reimagined by artists. Here’s the interpretation from Callen Schaub. Direct-to-consumer furniture designer Edenic Design’s origins came from founder David Miller’s love of art. “I’ve always been into the arts. Since I was a kid I was taking classes in the […]

As part of Edenic Design’s collaborative efforts, some tables are reimagined by artists. Here’s the interpretation from Callen Schaub.

Direct-to-consumer furniture designer Edenic Design’s origins came from founder David Miller’s love of art.

“I’ve always been into the arts. Since I was a kid I was taking classes in the student art league. My mother is a talented artist. Art has been integral to my interests and my life,” Miller told Home Accents Today. “I like designs and how when you enter a space, the way the elements in the space are organized can create a feeling. If it’s done well, you don’t notice it; you just feel it.”

When he graduated college and moved into his first apartment, Miller said he got carried away in designing the space. That spree led to the creation of the Teashi coffee table, the product that would eventually become the backbone of his online business.

He designed the metal and glass table and found a fabricator to create one, just for his new space. It turned into a prototype, which turned into a business, which Miller launched around 18 months ago.

“I was so happy with the way the producers fabricated the design I decided to see if I could do more of these,” Miller said. “I reached out to artists I’m fans of to see if we could collaborate. I thought it would be an interesting way to work with people I admire and create something great in the process and make a business of it.”

Once the prototype was in place, Miller decided to reach out to artists he follows on social media to see about collaborations. To date, he has established partnerships with Callen Schaub, Chris Trueman and Novik.

“That’s been my favorite part. Collaborating with artists has been the most fun aspect of this process. These are mostly just artists I’ve liked and followed on Instagram and thought they were cool,” Miller said. “When I started fabricating tables, I reached out to see if they might be interested. I was surprised by how many artists got back to me. It started off as [me being] a fan of the work they’re doing and taking a shot to see how they would respond. I shipped out tables to them and I let them do what they wanted; leave their thumbprint on the design to make it theirs as much as it is mine.”

The finished products show off a bit of Miller’s personality, as well as each artist’s.

“It’s interesting to see how each artist had their own take on the art and the design,” Miller said. “The table has a structured, geometric form which contrasted with Callem’s work because it focuses on letting go and letting the paint do its own thing. He felt his fluid, chaotic process applied to the structured, ordered form was an interesting marriage.”

While the coffee table has been a hit, Miller said he’s looking to add to the product assortment, and would include more artist collaborations with each ensuing piece. Next up is a dining table version of the Teashi as well as a chair, which Miller says he plans on calling Nami.

“I’ve got other designs that I’d like to produce. Every year, release a new design and re-collaborate with the artists and create a new collection based on those designs with the artists,” he said.

So what is Edenic Design’s target audience? Jason Pires, who handles marketing for the brand, said they’re making the products with younger entrepreneurs in mind.  “The target market is a homeowner who is a business owner and likes creative interiors. It says something about them and their overall energy. Think of an L.A. tech entrepreneur; he dresses minimally but at the end of the day he’s wearing a limited edition Rolex,” Pires said.

It’s also a brand that they agree should draw attention from interior designers.

“The design community is so important around this,” Pires said. “They’re the ones with the direct connections with these people, whether they’re buying directly or if the designer is curating the space for them.”

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