Revival: Frisco artist returns to Texas for art show | Frisco Enterprise

Emilee Geist

Lina Rincon, a Frisco-based artist and Frisco Visual Arts Guild president, returns to north Texas this week from Florida for “Revival,” a solo art show in McKinney following the wake of a house fire that displaced her from her home in July. Rincon’s solo show features her Equine art collection. […]

Lina Rincon, a Frisco-based artist and Frisco Visual Arts Guild president, returns to north Texas this week from Florida for “Revival,” a solo art show in McKinney following the wake of a house fire that displaced her from her home in July.

Rincon’s solo show features her Equine art collection. The show will have an opening reception from 7-9 p.m. Friday at 402 N. Tennessee St. in McKinney. The exhibition will also be open 7-9 p.m. Saturday.

Why is your solo show called Revival? What does revival mean to you right now?

Revival to me means a new beginning. You know the story about the Phoenix? How it lives, dies, and emerges from the ashes. Well that’s exactly how I feel about this show. After my tragedy I felt burned, I felt like I needed a new beginning. This show exemplifies that.

How do horses inspire you? Why did you choose to make them the focus of this show?

Horses are beautiful creatures. To me a horse represents power and freedom. This inspires me because its what I feel we as human’s lack. We don’t have enough power and freedom like a wild horse does. I made them the focus of my show in order for people to connect with this freedom and power. It is for the audience to find their soul through the horses.

How would you describe your art style?

My art style is abstract expressionism. In this show the audience can see a variety of styles that have emerged from different experiences throughout my life. One horse can be very detailed and figurative, while another one can be very abstract.

What is it like coming back to Frisco for this show after being in Florida?

I am so excited to be here!

What has it been like preparing this art for this show in the wake of having to leave your home due to a fire?

Crazy. I never realized how important and useful my studio was. At the old house pre-fire, I knew where all my supplies were, I knew where every little thing was. Now post-fire I have no idea where anything is. I am short of a lot of materials, and it made me realize that you can’t take life for granted. My studio is an escape, and now that I don’t have the luxury of having it like it once was, it really was hard to prepare for this show.

Was creating art for this solo show different for you in any way compared to other shows?

Yes of course! It’s hard to bring the artwork from Florida, the expense of it. Trying to coordinate everything from another state and then once I arrived it was nonstop planning and decorating.

What is the art scene in North Texas like compared to the art scene in Florida?

The art scene in Florida is very big! They have two major art communities that have been so welcoming! I’ve already been a part of two shows down there since I’ve moved. I don’t think there is something to compare. They both have amazing communities and as an artist our job is to educate people on art.

What is it like being an artist in Texas compared to being an artist in Florida?

Being an artist in North Texas is amazing! Everyone knows my work and knows who I am. In Florida it’s a little harder because no one knows me. I’m having to start from the bottom and work my way up. It’s hard but it’s an incredible journey.

What do you want those who visit your solo exhibition to get from seeing your work?

I want them to find their soul.

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